Film Review: “Greening the Revolution”

Editor December 4, 2012 0

Arizona Community Press | www.azcommunitypress.org

“Greening the Revolution” by Arizona writer/director Katie Curran tells the story of her journey across the world to witness food injustice. Places highlighted in this film include India, Kenya, Zambia, Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Haiti and the United States. It focuses on bringing awareness to the globalization of food production across the world and highlights how millions of farmers and people are starving because of government controlled land and rising food costs.  Using food as a symbol of inequality, the filmmakers explain and expose the corrupt cycle of globalization that perpetuates systems of poverty and oppressive social control.

Curran said she faced many dramatic challenges while filming “Greening the Revolution,” including having a gun held to her head while in Cuba when she visited Fidel Castro’s office. In many places she had to hide her camera under her dress or scarf so as not to be seen. She traveled to many of these Third World countries alone and relied on locals to guide her.

This led to a personal viewpoint of how these people live their daily lives.  In Haiti she found people who eat mud pies because regular food has become to expensive.  In India she found farmers driven to suicide due to high debt when there farms become debt dependent on patented seeds, patented fertilizer and patented bug repellent from GMO products.  In Mexico she found rebels who have taken to the mountains as modern agribusiness policy drove them from their farms.

“I wanted to investigate why there was so many hungry people in the world. Food is tied to so many injustices in the film,” said Curran, a former ABC news intern and PBS producer.

The film also explores the truth of promises from companies like Monsanto that Genetically Modified Food(GMO) and multi-national agribusiness will feed the world. Curran interviews Monsanto spokesman and others who set government policy. It examines both the production of modern food and how modern farmers live and work with these new processes and dares to ask the question: “If GMO’s make food cheaper and easier why are millions of people starving and food for consumers rising?”

“Green the Revolution” also presents a story of hope and how communities are standing up and achieving food justice through sustainable communities and “power of the people”. The documentary depicts farmers and workers who are organized, fighting back and implementing their own sustainable alternatives.

Katie Curran has stated, “There is a strong movement in the United States. People are learning how important it is to eat locally, organic, but the missing component there is political awareness. ”

Director Katie Curran will be at a film screening of “Greening the Revolution” answering questions this Thursday December 6th from 6-8pm at Fair Trade Cafe (Central and Roosevelt location) in Downtown Phoenix. Rachel Linden who worked on the controversial proposition 37 in California to label GMO food products is also expected to speak.